Administration on Aging

The mission of the Administration on Aging (AoA) is to help elderly individuals maintain their dignity and independence in their homes and communities through comprehensive, coordinated, and cost effective systems of long-term care, and livable communities across the U.S.


Alzheimer’s Association

The Alzheimer’s Association is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care, support and research. Its mission is to eliminate Alzheimer's disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health.


American Association Of Retired Persons (AARP)

Founded in 1958, AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan membership organization that helps people 50 and over improve the quality of their lives.

AARP has grown to 40 million members and has offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.

As the nation’s largest membership organization for people 50+, AARP is leading a revolution in the way people view and live life after 50.


American Cancer Society

The American Cancer Society is the nationwide, community-based, voluntary health organization dedicated to eliminating cancer as a major health problem by preventing cancer, saving lives, and diminishing suffering from cancer, through research, education, advocacy, and service.


American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.


American Geriatrics Society

The American Geriatrics Society (AGS) is a not-for-profit organization of over 6,700 health professionals devoted to improving the health, independence and quality of life of all older people. The Society provides leadership to healthcare professionals, policy makers and the public by implementing and advocating for programs in patient care, research, professional and public education, and public policy.


American Heart Association

The American Heart Association is a national voluntary health agency whose mission is: "Building healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke."

The mission statement was updated by the American Heart Association during its Annual Meeting in April 2007. The mission statement undergoes a formal review process every third year.

The association's impact goal is to reduce coronary heart disease, stroke and risk by 25 percent by 2010. Progress toward the goal will be measured according to these indicators:

  • Reduce the death rate from coronary heart disease and stroke by 25 percent.
  • Reduce the prevalence of smoking, high blood cholesterol and physical inactivity by 25 percent.
  • Reduce the rate of uncontrolled high blood pressure by 25 percent.
  • Eliminate the growth of obesity and diabetes.

American Parkinson’s Disease Association

The American Parkinson Disease Association, Inc. was founded in 1961 to "ease the burden and find a cure" for Parkinson's disease. Headquartered in New York, the organization focuses its energies on research, patient support, education and raising public awareness of the disease.


American Society on Aging

Founded in 1954, the American Society on Aging is an association of diverse individuals bound by a common goal: to support the commitment and enhance the knowledge and skills of those who seek to improve the quality of life of older adults and their families. The membership of ASA is a multidisciplinary array of professionals who are concerned with the physical, emotional, social, economic and spiritual aspects of aging. They range from practitioners, educators, administrators, policymakers, business people, researchers, students, and more.

ASA offers a diverse array of renowned educational programming, outstanding publications and state-of-the-art information and training resources, and the largest and most dynamic network of professionals in the field of aging. No matter what your needs or interests, when it comes to the field of aging, ASA is the most valuable resource you can find.


Arthritis Foundation

The Arthritis Foundation is the only national not-for-profit organization that supports the more than 100 types of arthritis and related conditions. Founded in 1948, with headquarters in Atlanta, the Arthritis Foundation has multiple service points located throughout the country. The Arthritis Foundation is the largest private, not-for-profit contributor to arthritis research in the world, funding more than $380 million in research grants since 1948. The foundation helps people take control of arthritis by providing public health education; pursuing public policy and legislation; and conducting evidence-based programs to improve the quality of life for those living with arthritis.


Assisted Living Foundation Of America

The Assisted Living Federation of America (ALFA) is the largest national association exclusively dedicated to professionally operated assisted living communities for seniors. ALFA's member-driven programs promote business and operational excellence through national conferences, research, publications, and executive networks. ALFA works to influence public policy by advocating for informed choice, quality care, and accessibility for all Americans.


Brookdale Center on Aging

Brookdale Center for Healthy Aging & Longevity of Hunter College is a multi-disciplinary center of excellence dedicated to the advancement of successful aging and longevity through research, education, and evaluation of evidence-based models of practice and policy.

As a center of Hunter College (CUNY), Brookdale’s mission is closely aligned with that of the College. Hunter College is a comprehensive teaching, research and service institution, long committed to excellence and access in the education of undergraduate and graduate students in the liberal arts and sciences, as well as in several professional fields: education, health sciences, nursing and social work. While teaching and research are its primary missions, community service is also an essential goal of the College. Faculty seek to generate new knowledge and to design programs to address the myriad cultural, social and political needs of New York City and the world.


Friends and Relatives of Institutional Aged (FRIA)

FRIA was founded in 1976 in response to major scandals that documented the severe neglect and physical and psychological abuse of elderly residents in a number of local nursing homes.

For over 30 years since then, FRIA has been the one-stop resource thousands of people have turned to for answers to complex questions concerning long term health care. Our main tools are our free telephone helpline; advocacy on individual complaints and policy issues; organizing and assisting family councils within nursing homes; consumer education publications; and presentations and workshops for family members, community groups and professionals.

FRIA believes that informed, empowered consumers make better decisions about eldercare for their own friends and family members and improve care for everybody. Our opinions are respected and solicited by legislators, policy makers, and families. We are widely recognized as the leading independent, consumer orientated source of information about all aspects of eldercare.


Medicaid

Good health is important to everyone. If you can't afford to pay for medical care right now, Medicaid can make it possible for you to get the care that you need so that you can get healthy – and stay healthy.

Medicaid is available only to certain low-income individuals and families who fit into an eligibility group that is recognized by federal and state law. Medicaid does not pay money to you; instead, it sends payments directly to your health care providers. Depending on your state's rules, you may also be asked to pay a small part of the cost (co-payment) for some medical services.

Medicaid is a state administered program and each state sets its own guidelines regarding eligibility and services. Read more about your state Medicaid program.

Many groups of people are covered by Medicaid. Even within these groups, though, certain requirements must be met. These may include your age, whether you are pregnant, disabled, blind, or aged; your income and resources (like bank accounts, real property, or other items that can be sold for cash); and whether you are a U.S. citizen or a lawfully admitted immigrant. The rules for counting your income and resources vary from state to state and from group to group. There are special rules for those who live in nursing homes and for disabled children living at home.

Your child may be eligible for coverage if he or she is a U.S. citizen or a lawfully admitted immigrant, even if you are not (however, there is a 5-year limit that applies to lawful permanent residents). Eligibility for children is based on the child's status, not the parent's. Also, if someone else's child lives with you, the child may be eligible even if you are not because your income and resources will not count for the child.

In general, you should apply for Medicaid if your income is low and you match one of the descriptions of the Eligibility Groups. (Even if you are not sure whether you qualify, if you or someone in your family needs health care, you should apply for Medicaid and have a qualified caseworker in your state evaluate your situation.)


Medicare

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) administers Medicare, the nation's largest health insurance program, which covers nearly 40 million Americans. Medicare is a Health Insurance Program for people age 65 or older, some disabled people under age 65, and people of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure treated with dialysis or a transplant).

Medicare is a Health Insurance Program for:

  • People age 65 or older.
  • People under age 65 with certain disabilities
  • People of all ages with End-Stage Renal Disease (permanent kidney failure requiring dialysis or a transplant).
    Medicare has Two Parts:

Part A (Hospital Insurance)
Most people don't have to pay for Part A.

Part B (Medical Insurance)
Most people pay monthly for Part B.

You can choose different ways to get the services covered by Medicare. Depending on where you live, you may have different choices. In most cases, when you first get Medicare, you are in Original Medicare. You may want to consider a Medicare Prescription Drug Plan to add drug coverage. Or, you may want to consider a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO) that provides all your Part A, Part B, and often Part D coverage. You make a choice when you are first eligible for Medicare. Each year you can review your health and prescription needs and switch to a different plan in the fall.


Medicare Rights Center

The Medicare Rights Center is a national, nonprofit consumer service organization that works to ensure access to affordable health care for older adults and people with disabilities through counseling and advocacy, educational programs and public policy initiatives.

Since 1989, we’ve been helping people with Medicare understand their rights and benefits, navigate the Medicare system and secure the quality care they deserve. We’re the largest and most reliable independent source of Medicare information and assistance in the United States.

Our offices are located in New York City and Washington, D.C., but through our phone hotlines, internet services, large volunteer network and community programs we work with clients no matter where they are located.

Today, there are nearly 45 million people with Medicare—and we’re here to help not just them, but also their caregivers and the health care professionals who serve them.

We empower Americans to help themselves, and when they need it, take action on their behalf.


National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys

The NAELA membership is comprised of attorneys in the private and public sectors who deal with legal issues affecting seniors and people with disabilities. Members also include judges, professors of law, and students.

The National Academy of Elder Law Attorneys, Inc. (NAELA) was founded in 1987 as a professional association of attorneys who are dedicated to improving the quality of legal services provided to seniors and people with special needs.

The primary focus of the Academy is education. The Academy sponsors continuing legal education programs on elder law for attorneys throughout the year, and provides publications and educational materials to its members on a wide range of elder law topics.

The Academy seeks to provide support to other organizations serving seniors and people with disabilities. NAELA also examines and advocates on public policy issues facing seniors and people with special needs, but does not provide direct legal services.


National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers

The National Association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers (NAPGCM) is an association of Professional Geriatric Care Managers (PGCMs) who are health and human services specialists helping families care for older relatives, while encouraging as much independence as possible. The PGCM may be trained in any of a number of fields related to long-term care, including, but not limited to, nursing, gerontology, social work, or psychology, with a specialized focus on issues related to aging and elder care. The PGCM acts as a guide and advocate -- identifying problems and offering solutions, from assessment of an aging parent's needs to addressing the life change of a family affected by Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinsons or other symptoms of dementia.


National Council On Aging

The National Council on Aging is a non-profit service and advocacy organization headquartered in Washington, DC.

  • NCOA is a national voice for older adults – especially those who are vulnerable and disadvantaged -- and the community organizations that serve them.
  • NCOA brings together non-profit organizations, businesses and government to develop creative solutions that improve the lives of all older adults.
  • NCOA works with thousands of organizations across the country to help seniors live independently, find jobs and benefits, improve their health, live independently and remain active in their communities

National Family Caregivers Association

The National Family Caregivers Association educates, supports, empowers and speaks up for the more than 50 million Americans who care for loved ones with a chronic illness or disability or the frailties of old age. NFCA reaches across the boundaries of diagnoses, relationships and life stages to help transform family caregivers' lives by removing barriers to health and well being.

NFCA's core Caring Every Day messages are:

  • Believe in Yourself.
  • Protect Your Health.
  • Reach Out for Help.
  • Speak Up for Your Rights.

National Hospice Foundation

Caring Connections, a program of the National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization (NHPCO), is a national consumer and community engagement initiative to improve care at the end of life, supported by a grant from The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

  • Provides free resources and information to help people make decisions about end-of-life care and services before a crisis.
  • Brings together community, state and national partners working to improve end-of-life care through a national campaign called It's About How You LIVE.

National Institute of Health

NIH is the steward of medical and behavioral research for the Nation. Its mission is science in pursuit of fundamental knowledge about the nature and behavior of living systems and the application of that knowledge to extend healthy life and reduce the burdens of illness and disability.

The goals of the agency are as follows:

  1. foster fundamental creative discoveries, innovative research strategies, and their applications as a basis to advance significantly the Nation's capacity to protect and improve health;
  2. develop, maintain, and renew scientific human and physical resources that will assure the Nation's capability to prevent disease;
  3. expand the knowledge base in medical and associated sciences in order to enhance the Nation's economic well-being and ensure a continued high return on the public investment in research; and
  4. exemplify and promote the highest level of scientific integrity, public accountability, and social responsibility in the conduct of science.

National Senior Citizens Law Center

The National Senior Citizens Law Center advocates nationwide to promote the independence and well-being of low-income elderly and disabled Americans.

Since 1972, the National Senior Citizens Law Center has worked to promote the independence and well-being of low-income elderly and disabled Americans, especially women, people of color, and other disadvantaged minorities. Because we believe in publicly-funded safety net programs, we work to preserve and strengthen Medicaid, Medicare Part D, Social Security and SSI. To guarantee fair treatment, we work for greater access to federal courts for citizens and for better enforcement of consumer’s legal rights in safety net programs.

NSCLC works toward an America in which elderly people and people with disabilities can live in dignity and safety, free of the worries and pain of poverty, able to afford health care to the end of their days, and able to contribute to their families and societies to the best of their abilities.

National Stroke Association

National Stroke Association is the only national organization in the United States that focuses 100% of its efforts on stroke. National Stroke Association achieves its mission to lower the incidence and impact of stroke by developing compelling community outreach programs, calling for continued improvement in the quality of stroke patient care, and educating both healthcare professionals and the general public about stroke.

Established in 1984, National Stroke Association has never lost sight of its vision to reach as many individuals as possible and be a beacon of hope for stroke survivors. We strive every day to increase public awareness about stroke prevention, symptom recognition, treatment options and rehabilitation.

National Stroke Association reaches out to people who want to learn more about stroke, have survived a stroke, know someone who has suffered a stroke, or care for a stroke survivor.


New York City Department for the Aging (DFTA)

If you are a New Yorker, 60 and over, important areas of your life could well be enhanced by options offered through the Department for the Aging.

There are choices that help toward more independence and challenges for greater productivity. For example, you may be eligible for exemption from a rent increase; you may need a home-delivered meal or home care services; or you may seek employment that is rewarding.

You may want to volunteer your services to others, join a local senior center, or participate in a Department event.

Or maybe you just need solid answers to some vital questions from a reliable source.

The Department for the Aging's Web site lists programs and services tailored to a variety of specific needs that many of the 1.3 million older New Yorkers may want now or in the future.


New York State Office For The Aging

Older New Yorkers are a great resource for our State. They have made tremendous contributions to our social fabric. We want to support them and their families to live their lives with dignity and independence, and we dedicate ourselves to protecting their health, safety and independence.

New York State offers a wide array of services for our growing population of elders. The New York State Office for the Aging, in cooperation with county and borough programs for aging in New York City, helps to guide elders, their families and caregivers to opportunities that enhance their lives. Our office is also charged with advocating for our elders at every level of government and throughout our local communities. We are committed to conveying their views, protecting their rights and ensuring that their needs are addressed.


New York State Long-Term Care Ombudsman (Office For The Aging)

The Long Term Care Ombudsman Program (or LTCOP) is a federal advocacy program dedicated to protecting people living in long term care facilities. In New York State, the Office for the Aging operates LTCOP though its Office of the State Long Term Care Ombudsman.

The State Ombudsman supervises Substate Ombudsman Coordinators who serve all communities throughout the state. Substate Ombudsman programs are sponsored either by area agencies on aging or other qualified organizations.

The heart of the Long Term Care Ombudsman Program is its corps of specially trained and certified citizen-volunteer ombudsmen. Many volunteers are retired professionals from various fields. These dedicated Ombudsmen spend an average of four to six hours a week in each of their assigned facilities, advocating for the residents.


Social Security Administration

We deliver services through a nationwide network of over 1,400 offices that include regional offices, field offices, card centers, teleservice centers, processing centers, hearing offices, the Appeals Council, and our State and territorial partners, the Disability Determination Services. We also have a presence in U.S. embassies around the globe. For the public, we are the “face of the government.” The rich diversity of our employees mirrors the public we serve.


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